Remembering Turkey

Five years ago, when we visited Turkey, the world was different. The news of violent clashes and turmoil in the country is upsetting, especially since I had the fortune of experiencing its astounding beauty and the gracious warmth of the Turkish people. I’ve taken this opportunity to review my photos of the trip and have selected a group of my favorites. You can see all of my posts about Turkey here.

 

wee folk sprouting up all over

Weefolk-1-18I can’t remember a more glorious spring here on Cape Cod! The days are clear and warm, but not too hot, with zero humidity. And the yard is full of perfectly scaled vegetation and flowers for wee folk to ramble through, including bugle weed, forget-me-nots and buttercups. Here’s a selection of characters who escaped from my studio into the outdoors, some from my how-to book,  Felt Wee Folk – New Adventures.

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How about a lattice topped pie in an acorn cap?

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Weefolk-1-19Poppies are ready to pop.

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Little Red Riding Hood makes her way across the bugle weed forest…

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And a fairy bride and groom dance through a field of buttercups!

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Studio insights

Here’s a glimpse at some of the many photos I’ve been taking in and around my studio with my phone camera. It’s really an excuse to play with my toys! I love how quick and easy it is to snap close-up images and share them on Facebook and Instagram. But, since not everyone wants to be tethered to multiple social media platforms, I thought I’d show a recent selection of my daily photos on this blog, too.

There are pictures of old and newer pieces, from my collection of insects made 37 years ago, to original bas relief children’s book illustrations, to newer wee folk characters from Felt Wee Folk. These days, I’m pretty busy working on some exciting projects that I can’t talk about yet, so my blog posts will be less frequent. If you’d like to keep up with regular posted images, I invite you to “like” my Facebook and Instagram pages.

Greenland – Ittoqqortoormitt

Ittoqqortoormitt

On his photo excursion to Greenland, my husband Rob visited the northern most village of Ittoqqortoormitt, which is settled by about 300 Inuit. The community has hunted polar bears for generations and is allowed an annual quota of 35 hides.  Even in mid September, there were still patches of snow scattered about. I must point out again that there is nothing green about Greenland.

As he walked around, Rob met and photographed people he saw outside, mostly men. They did their best to communicate with sign language and a minimum of English. I hope you enjoy this glimpse at a unique place and people!

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Polar bear hide

Polar bear hide

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View from Kong Oscar Fjord

View from Kong Oscar Fjord

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Greenland reflections

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My husband, Rob Goldsborough went on a trip to Greenland in September. He and about a dozen photographers traveled aboard a small cruise ship, into several fjords on the west end of Scorespy Sound. The group took daily excursions on inflatable zodiacs, which brought them closer to land and floating ice.

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Rob described this northern landscape as being different from what we saw in Antarctica (see posts here). Both had tons of ice, but there was more bare ground in Greenland during this time of year. Of course, there’s nothing green in sight! The story goes that early explorers named it Greenland in hopes of attracting European settlers. Rob visited a village, which I’ll show in another post. For now, I hope you enjoy his beautiful series of reflections taken from the zodiac.

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